sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info
sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 
Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick
These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 
I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.
This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 
These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 
Zoom Info

sun0fagun:

The Psychology of Cinematography: 

Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Darren Aronofsky, Quentin Tarantino & Stanley Kubrick

These are all shots where the emphasis is on the entirety of the shot as a whole and provides a much more distant kind of view, allowing the goings on to register as it is instead of having a specific cinematic mood attached. 

I’ve never heard anyone say not to try for symmetry in your shots, but I was told to be aware of the psychological effect it has on audiences. This little reel is a prime example of how off-putting symmetry can be in motion picture photography. Even in the ones in which there is no immediate danger or horror present. You feel like there’s something wrong in every one of these shots. You can’t put your finger on it, but you know things aren’t quite right. The psychology of symmetry is used whenever a filmmaker wants to put an audience at unease. Which, as you can see, was often.

This concept can be applied to many other concepts and styles of cinematography such as  Look down, look up, Hiphop cuts, mood lighting etc. 

These are some of my favorite examples cinematography put in a gif set. 

vintageblackglamour:

Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba in 1926. Photo circa 1940s. This is one of the first pictures I shared on VBG, found via Scott Schuman’s fantastic blog, The Sartorialist. It was submitted by Ms. Frias’s daughter, Ena Frias, and she provided this description to The Sartorialist:"This is my beautiful mother, Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba on March 23, 1926. This photograph was taken sometime in the mid to late 1940’s. I believe she was at a christening of a friend’s child in Havana. She was an amazing and inspirational woman - making her way to the US with my father by way of Miami in late 1959, and ending up in New York City two years later, where I was born and raised. She was always a fashionista and had that amazing aura that exuded beauty, charm and grace. And boy could she pose for a picture, eh? She always will be my very own personal style icon.”

vintageblackglamour:

Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba in 1926. Photo circa 1940s. This is one of the first pictures I shared on VBG, found via Scott Schuman’s fantastic blog, The Sartorialist. It was submitted by Ms. Frias’s daughter, Ena Frias, and she provided this description to The Sartorialist:

"This is my beautiful mother, Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba on March 23, 1926. This photograph was taken sometime in the mid to late 1940’s. I believe she was at a christening of a friend’s child in Havana. She was an amazing and inspirational woman - making her way to the US with my father by way of Miami in late 1959, and ending up in New York City two years later, where I was born and raised. She was always a fashionista and had that amazing aura that exuded beauty, charm and grace. And boy could she pose for a picture, eh? She always will be my very own personal style icon.”